World Tai Chi & Qigong Day


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Researchers from the MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas found that practicing qi gong was linked with decreased depression and increased quality of life in women who were undergoing radiotherapy for their breast cancer.

The findings are important because past research has shown an association between depression and worse outcomes for cancer patients.

The new study, published in the journal Cancer, included 96 Chinese women who had stage 1, 2 or 3 breast cancer and were going to the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center in China. ...

Researchers found that women who did qi gong experienced a decrease in depressive symptoms by the end of the study, while women who were in the control group didn't experience any decrease in symptoms. They also noted that the women who had the highest scores on the depression scale were the ones who experienced the greatest benefit -- both in decreased depressive symptoms and improved quality of life -- from qi gong.

Read entire article ...

-- Huffington Post, January 28, 2013


CANBERRA, Sept. 16 (Xinhua) -- The traditional Chinese exercise of Tai Chi helps women who develop persistent arm swelling after breast cancer surgery, an Australian researcher has found.

An Australian Associated Press report on Friday quoted Neil Piller of the Flinders Medical Center in Adelaide, South Australia, as saying that up to 30 percent of breast cancer patients develop a condition known as lymphoedema after a mastectomy or partial breast removal.

Read entire article at RedOrbit

Breast cancer. Tai chi has shown potential for improving quality of life and functional capacity (the physical ability to carry out normal daily activities, such as work or exercise) in women suffering from breast cancer or the side effects of breast cancer treatment. For example, a 2008 study at the University of Rochester, published in Medicine and Sport Science, found that quality of life and functional capacity (including aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and flexibility) improved in women with breast cancer who did 12 weeks of tai chi, while declining in a control group that received only supportive therapy.

Harvard Medical School's Health Publications, May, 2009

Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) may be a useful form of aerobic exercise capable of improving inflammatory profiles and cardiovascular function (CF) among breast cancer survivors.

University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY. Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC. University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, NC.

CONCLUSION: These data suggest that TCC may improve inflammatory profiles and that these changes may be associated with changes in CF. More definitive phase III randomized clinical trials are needed to confirm these results. Funded by NCI grant 1R25CA102618 and Sally Schindel Cone Fund

The Tai Chi group demonstrated significant improvements in Quality of Life, while the Psychosocial Support group reported declines in Quality of Life. Additionally, the Tai Chi group exhibited improvements in self-esteem, while the Psychosocial Support group reported declines in self-esteem.

-- Support Care Cancer, 12, 871-6

This study examined the effects of qi-gong therapy on complete blood counts in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. The experimental group received a 21-day qi-gong therapy. Significant differences in white blood cells, platelets and hemoglobin over the 3-week therapy suggested that qi-gong therapy may decrease leukopenia in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

-- Cancer Nursing, 29, 149-55

Tai Chi Chuan, health-related quality of life and self-esteem: a randomized trial with breast cancer survivors. Mustian KM, Katula JA, Gill DL, Roscoe JA, Lang D, Murphy K.Behavioral Medicine Unit, Department of Radiation Oncology, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 704, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

GOALS: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) and self-esteem are often diminished among women diagnosed and treated for breast cancer. Tai Chi is a moderate form of exercise that may be an effective therapy for improving HRQL and self-esteem among these women. We sought to compare the efficacy of Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) and psychosocial support (PST) for improving HRQL and self-esteem among breast cancer survivors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A group of 21 women diagnosed with breast cancer, who had completed treatment within the last 30 months were randomized to receive 12 weeks of TCC or PST. Participants in both groups met three times a week for 60 minutes. HRQL and self-esteem were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. RESULTS: The TCC group demonstrated significant improvements in HRQL, while the PST group reported declines in HRQL, with the differences between the two groups approaching significance at week 12. Additionally, the TCC group exhibited improvements in self-esteem, while the PST group reported declines in self-esteem, with the differences between groups reaching statistical significance at week 12. These findings, coupled with a visual inspection of the raw change scores, support the plausibility of a dose-response relationship concerning Tai Chi.

CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot investigation, the TCC group exhibited improvements in HRQL and self-esteem from baseline to 6 and 12 weeks, while the support group exhibited declines.

Harvard Medical School Releases Historic
Tai Chi Medical Research Lecture to Commemorate
World Tai Chi & Qigong Day!

The new Harvard Medical School Guide to Tai Chi is a powerful reference book for all tai chi and qigong advocates, teachers, etc., and the guide cites's expansion of global awareness of tai chi and qigong!

VIDEO - How Tai Chi and Chi Kung Help Heal or Prevent Illness

VIDEO: Qigong Breathing Tutorial

Also, search the Qigong Institute's "Qigong and Energy Medicine Database," for research abstracts on Tai Chi & Qigong.

The Qigong and Energy Medicine Database™ is a compilation of references to a series of extensive clinical and experimental research on medical applications of Qigong carried out in China and beyond beginning about 1980. These studies as well as to reports in scientific journals, books, international conferences, and The National Library of Medicine and PubMed. The Qigong and Energy Medicine Database™ provides a record in English of the vast amount of clinical and experimental research on Qigong from China as well from other countries. Included are reports of therapies that have been tried and claimed to be effective. These reports can be used as a guide for improving health and for deciding what further research may be required to confirm promising applications of Qigong.

The Qigong & Energy Medicine Database™ contains references not only to Qigong but also to other energy-based research, therapies, clinical trials, and practices. While the emphasis is on scientific reports, reviews are provided in some cases. The Database contains abstracts (not full text). Abstracts range in length from a paragraph to several pages and may contain information on methodology, controlled experiments, results summarized in tables, and statistical analysis.

Click below to begin using the Qigong Institute's Qigong and Energy Medicine Database:

* NOTE: World Tai Chi & Qigong Day advises consulting your physician before beginning any new exercise, herbal, diet, or health program. The research listed here is meant to stimulate a discussion between you and your physician, health insurance carrier, etc., not as medical advise. Research and comments provided here are hoped to stimulate a more robust discussion of powerful natural mind/body health tools.
Check for World Tai Chi & Qigong Day articles on various health conditions and Tai Chi & Qigong (Chi Kung) Therapy, that you may publish on your publication or website, by clicking here.

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Popular media, health media, and government must increase attention to stunning emerging research, including the UCLA study indicating Tai Chi participants enjoyed a 50% increase in immune system resistance to viral infection.

Many of these health listings are provided courtesy of excerpts from

Reprinting is strictly forbidden without express written consent from the
author. To inquire for reprint permission, email:

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